Scoliosis

whatis-scoliosisThis is a common condition that is diagnosed in adolescents during school physicals. Scoliosis is
a sideways curvature of the spine that occurs most often during the growth spurt just before
puberty. While scoliosis can be caused by conditions such as cerebral palsy and muscular
dystrophy, the cause of most scoliosis is unknown.

Most cases of scoliosis are mild, but some children develop spine deformities that continue to get
more severe as they grow. Severe scoliosis can be disabling. An especially severe spinal curve
can reduce the amount of space within the chest, making it difficult for the lungs to function
properly.

Children who have mild scoliosis are monitored closely, usually with X-rays, to see if the curve
is getting worse. In many cases, no treatment is necessary. Some children will need to wear a
brace to stop the curve from worsening. Others may need surgery to keep the scoliosis from
worsening and to straighten severe cases of scoliosis.

Signs and symptoms of scoliosis may include:

  • Uneven shoulders
  • One shoulder blade that appears more prominent than the other
  • Uneven waist
  • One hip higher than the other

If a scoliosis curve gets worse, the spine will also rotate or twist, in addition to curving side to
side. This causes the ribs on one side of the body to stick out farther than on the other side.
Severe scoliosis can cause back pain and difficulty breathing.

The doctor will initially take a detailed medical history and may ask questions about recent
growth. During the physical exam, your doctor may have your child stand and then bend forward
from the waist, with arms hanging loosely, to see if one side of the rib cage is more prominent
than the other.

Your doctor may also perform a neurological exam to check for:

  • Muscle weakness
  • Numbness
  • Abnormal reflexes

Plain X-rays can confirm the diagnosis of scoliosis and reveal the severity of the spinal
curvature. If a doctor suspects that an underlying condition — such as a tumor — is causing the
scoliosis, he or she may recommend additional imaging tests.

When the problem becomes severe enough, braces or surgery may be necessary. The chiropractic
approach is to use specific spinal adjustments along with a program of corrective exercises.
Chiropractors return the vertebrae to a more normal position. With careful monitoring, regular
treatment and exercise the spinal deformity of scoliosis can be minimized and invasive
procedures can be avoided.